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European human rights judges ground Rwanda flight MINUTES before take-off

European human rights judges caused a furor last night by grounding the migrant flight from Rwanda just minutes before takeoff.

Lawyers managed to get the remaining seven migrants removed from the plane, which was waiting on the tarmac.

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The fury was sparked last night after European human rights judges grounded the migrant flight from Rwanda minutes before takeoff.
Rwanda's controversial plan could now remain on the ground for weeks, or even months.

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Rwanda’s controversial plan could now remain on the ground for weeks, or even months.Credit: Pennsylvania

British judges rejected their appeals, but the European Court of Human Rights obtained an injunction on the dismissals.

Rwanda’s controversial plan could now remain grounded for weeks or even months.

Britain is still a member of the ECHR, but the prime minister could now scrap that and change the law.

And in explosive statements, Boris Johnson also accused the lawyers representing immigrants of “instigating the work of criminal gangs.”

Boris criticizes the critics
Judges approve plan to fly migrants to Rwanda, but first flight could be EMPTY

Johnson and Home Secretary Priti Patel are now bracing for more legal challenges as they try to get flights to Africa off the ground.

Last-minute appeals were launched to the Government in an attempt to stop the flight from taking off at 9:30 p.m. from Boscombe Down Military Airfield in Wiltshire.

Multiple UK courts have ruled that the deportation flight, designed to deter migrants from making the dangerous Channel crossing, could go ahead.

Amid the impasse, the prime minister said he was “inclined” to change the way lawyers can challenge policies.

He said they are very good at finding ways to try to prevent the government from “upholding what we think is sensible law.”

With lawyers representing immigrants in his sights, Johnson added: “We want people to be able to come here. We want them to do it legally and safely. Will it be necessary to change some laws? It is very possible that it is.

As Rwanda’s policy was criticized by lawyers, luvvies and wacko bishops, the prime minister lashed out at those who challenged his work to strengthen Britain’s border.

At a cabinet meeting, Johnson said: “I’m afraid they are undermining everything we are trying to do to support safe and legal routes for people to come to the UK and oppose illegal and dangerous routes.”

‘Undermining people’s trust’

The number of migrants on the first flight dropped from more than 130 to just a handful last night.

Justice Swift rejected four belated appeals at the High Court in London, while the High Court dismissed an attempt to stop the flight.

But the European Court of Human Rights blocked the deportation of one person hours before takeoff, prompting belated appeals from the remaining six.

The Strasbourg court has a long history of clashes with the government, including a call for prisoners to be given the vote.

Earlier in the day, the angry prime minister insisted that human rights lawyers were “undermining people’s confidence in the safe and legal system, undermining people’s general acceptance of immigration.”

It should never be okay to rock our beaches illegally having come from another safe European country and then be able to stay here.

tom hunt

Despite the setback, he promised the flights would take off, adding: “It may take a while for it to work properly, that doesn’t mean we won’t go ahead.” Downing Street hopes to have another flight ready and full in “weeks”.

But the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, continued his political intervention on the plan. He said the policy “embarrasses us as a nation.”
And Sarah Ferguson, the ex-wife of the disgraced Prince Andrew, also weighed in.

Asked on Times Radio if he thought it was “immoral”, he said: “So I strongly believe my answer should be: Are you sure you have listened to the needs of the displaced person?”

Amid a wave of protests near the Ministry of Defense airfield yesterday, and as another 300 migrants, including babies and young children, landed on British shores after crossing the English Channel from France, Conservative MPs closed the blockade. .

Tom Hunt said it was “decisive” that many of the most vocal critics of Rwanda’s policy are members of society’s elite who have never had to live with the consequences of uncontrolled illegal immigration, the problem he said the policy of Rwanda is designed to address. .

He added: “It should never be okay to rock out on our beaches illegally having come from another safe European country and then be able to stay here.”

‘Punishment’

A Rwandan government spokeswoman said they did not see the flight as a “punishment”.

She said they expected to welcome “thousands” of migrants during the partnership, which will see the UK spend £120m on growth and development in Rwanda, as well as bear resettlement costs.

The spokeswoman said: “Rwanda has a strong track record of bringing security to people in distress.

“When the first flight lands in Kigali, those who arrive will be welcomed and cared for and supported to make a new life here.”

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman defended the cost of the policy following claims that the first flight could leave taxpayers with a £500,000 bill.

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A jet, used by top Spanish soccer teams including Real Betis, was hired to ferry the migrants.

But the spokesman said it was a drop in the bucket compared to “the cost of the current approach to the UK taxpayer, which is already £1.5bn every year”.

Johnson said:

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Johnson said, “We’re trying to make a distinction between the legal avenues that we support.”Credit: Simon Jones
Migrants gesture as they arrive at port on the Border Force ship Valiant after attempting to cross the English Channel from France on June 14, 2022.

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Migrants gesture as they arrive at port on the Border Force ship Valiant after attempting to cross the English Channel from France on June 14, 2022.Credit: Getty
Activists have blocked the road near the Colnbrook removal center where some of the asylum seekers who were due to be on the flight from Rwanda tonight were being held.

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Activists have blocked the road near the Colnbrook removal center where some of the asylum seekers who were due to be on the flight from Rwanda tonight were being held.Credit: Unknown, clear with images desktop
A soldier carries a small child ashore from the Border Force ship Valiant after attempting to cross the English Channel from France on June 14.

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A soldier carries a small child ashore from the Border Force ship Valiant after attempting to cross the English Channel from France on June 14.Credit: Getty

ROW ‘HUMAN RIGHTS’

VIRTUALLY all last-minute appeals from immigrants are based on article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which recognizes the right “to private life, family life, home and correspondence”.

Ministers say judges have interpreted it so broadly that criminal aliens manipulate it to avoid deportation. Restricting the use of Article 8 is at the heart of Attorney General Dominic Raab’s plan to replace the Human Rights Act with a Bill of Rights.

Membership of the ECHR is independent of being in the EU.

Yesterday, groups of lawyers criticized the prime minister for attacking their profession. In a joint statement, the Bar Association and the Law Society of England and Wales condemned Boris Johnson’s “misleading and dangerous” comments.

They said: “We call on the Prime Minister to stop the attacks on legal professionals who are simply doing their job.”

TOTAL WAR AGAINST POLITICS

By Jonathan Reily

The government’s policy in Rwanda has taken a beating from the left and from forceful lawyers with pound signs in their eyes.

From hard-line unions to ice cream companies desperate to show signs of virtue, we take a look at the main opponents.

CPS Union: Mark Serwotka, general secretary of the Public and Commercial Services Union, sought to prevent the policy through an appeal to the High Court. The union represents immigration personnel whose job it is to safeguard our borders.

Array cameras: They represented the PCS union. Lawyer Raza Husain recently described Downing Street as a “cesspool”.

Leigh’s Day: The law firm was accused of a “witch hunt” against British soldiers in Iraq. He says he will continue to oppose deportations to Rwanda on behalf of the Asylum Aid charity despite losing in the Court of Appeal on Monday.

Duncan Lewis Attorneys: Also hired to challenge the scheme. They received £55m in legal aid in just three years, it was reported in 2020.

Doughty Street: Legal chambers where Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer practiced and where lawyer Amal Clooney works. She supplied lawyers in the failed attempt to stop Priti Patel’s scheme.

Clergy: Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and all senior Church of England leadership denounced the plans as an “immoral policy that shames Britain” despite offering no alternative.

UNHCR: He warned of shortcomings in the capacity of Rwanda’s asylum system. However, he evacuated refugees from the Libyan conflict to that country.

Ben & Jerry’s: US ice cream firm Woke tweeted: “Listen up folks because we need to talk about Priti Patel’s ‘ugly’ plan in Rwanda and what this means.”

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